Restorative justice is an increasingly important and interesting movement in criminal justice. A number of schools offer courses on it at all levels, from primary to graduate schools.

Research continues to play an important role, which means that there are a number of evidence-based conclusions about its relative strengths compared to the justice system. 

Students

Check out these links . . . .

. . . . for a four page overview of restorative justice; for a more detailed tutorial called Introduction to Restorative Justice . . . .

. . . . for the executive summary of a research report comparing the effectiveness of restorative approaches to criminal justice; for the full report . . . .

. . . . for a YouTube video of a victim telling about her restorative encounter with her father's killer . . . .

. . . . for the kinds of crimes where restorative practices have been used (some may surprise you).

Teachers

Check out these links . . . .

. . . . for a tutorial introducing restorative justice you can assign 

. . . . for syllabi used in restorative justice classes 

. . . . for reviews of books and videos on restorative justice 

. . . . for role plays using restorative practices 

. . . . for how to approach plagiarism based on restorative justice principles  

. . . . for teaching restorative practices in the classroom.

More articles on teaching and studying

Teacher talk, restorative practice, and tricky kids.

Source: (2009) Presentation at Restorative Practices in Schools: The Way Forward. 20 October 2009, Melbourne, Australia.This PowerPoint presentation was from a workshop exploring the topic of teacher language. The workshop description was "A pract... Read More

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