Source: (2003) In, Tatsuya Ota, ed., Victims and Criminal Justice: Asian Perspective. Tokoyo, Hogaku-Kenkyu-Kai, Keio University. Pp.279-310.

The role of the Thai police in crime control involves three broad areas: prevention, suppression, and oppression. The first section of this chapter addresses only crime prevention and suppression. The police-supported crime prevention programs deal primarily with the participation of citizens in protecting themselves from crime. These programs usually target crimes against life, body, and property. Suppression of crime involves a reasonable use of police power or authority to control criminal behavior in order to bring the offender to justice. The second section of this chapter discusses international trends in victim and witness participation in criminal justice administration. The United Nations Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and Abuse of Power is viewed as the centerpiece for the international response to crime victims, and its provisions are outlined. Other issues discussed in this section are the concept of career victims and victim compensation as well as victim and witness assistance programs. The next major section of the chapter profiles the legal status of crime victims and victim assistance programs in Thailand. The Thai Constitution, established in 1997, has provisions for the protection of crime victims in accordance with the U.N. Declaration of Basic Principles of Justice for Victims of Crime and the Abuse of Power. The victim of crime is legally defined under the Criminal Procedure Code as "an injured person who has received injury through the commission of an offense." Also discussed in this section are civil liabilities for a wrongful act, national public welfare services, and public service and humanitarian law. The concluding section of the chapter addresses crime victim compensation and restitution in Thailand. Abstract courtesy of National Criminal Justice Reference Service,