Source: (2008) Report of the fifth conference of the European Forum for Restorative Justice, Building restorative justice in Europe: cooperation between the public, policy makers, practitioners and researchers, Verona.

The Nenagh community Reparation Project was the initiative of Judge Michael Reilly, following his visit to Tunaru, New Zealand, where a similar project is ongoing. The Project seeks to harness the moral resources and local knowledge of the community in identifying and prioritising the concerns surrounding problems of crime, disorder and crime prevention within the community. It has been in operation since June 1999. It is a partnership of the community, Gardai (Police), Probation Service and other relevant stakeholders, working together to address the underlying factors leading to serious problems and crime. It has been our experience that by dealing with these issues within the community, the offender is given a chance to reform and reintegrate back into the community. Healing rather than retribution is sought. It is pertinent that the OED defines ‘Restorative’ as an attempt “to reinstate, bring back to dignity or right; bring back to health etc, to cure”. This encapsulates our approach... The Project seeks to facilitate the offender in addressing their offending behaviour andproblems of addiction and/or poor self control, which may have been a contributing factor in their offending. The offender is also given an opportunity to make reparation to the community by completing tasks or volunteering their labour for the benefit of the community. (excerpt)