Source: (2004) IP2 (2004)28 REV(web). Strasbourg: Council of Europe. Downloaded 3 May 2005.

Everyday violence poses a challenge to our fundamental values and therefore has to be met with a determined response. It is not an intrinsic part of the human condition: violence can be prevented and reduced while its consequences can be alleviated. But since violence in everyday life is a multifaceted problem with psychological, social, cultural and economic ramifications, it has to be confronted across this wide spectrum through a broad and co-ordinated partnership. By presenting the conclusions and results of the Integrated Project "Responses to violence in everyday life in a democratic society", carried out by the Council of Europe in 2002-04, this report sets out a European agenda for reducing everyday violence. Building on the Council's earlier work against violence, the Project focused on comprehensive policy development and the preparation of a new set of practical tools to prevent violence in everyday life. The objective of the report is to assist member states in their continuous task of confronting violence and making the lives of their citizens safer. The report is divided into four chapters: Chapter 1 presents twelve policy principles which can be used in the formulation of national policy and action plan for preventing and reducing violence in everyday life. Chapter 2 probes the extent of our knowledge about national situations related to everyday violence concluding with recommendations on improving such knowledge. Chapter 3 discusses structural and contextual factors of violence with reference to inter-cultural and inter-faith dialogue, social cohesion, the mass media and fear of violence. Chapter 4 lists the results of the Integrated Project and other relevant Council of Europe documents providing a treasure trove for activities aimed at reducing violence. (excerpt)