Source: (1993) Journal of Crime and Justice, Vol.16, No.2, pp.43-59,1993.

The "New Age" movement of the 1980's and 1990's is big business. "New Age" thinking is an optimistic set of beliefs that focuses on such issues as human transcendence, expanded consciousness, global peace, and ecological awareness. Radical transformation is the central vision and experience of the New Age. This vision of personal transformation, according to much of New Age thinking, can be imposed on society and the world at large. The New Age movement has four distinct emphases: metaphysical inquiry, mind control, emotional healing, and financial well-being. Of these four areas, emotional healing is the most compatible with current correctional treatment philosophy. Most offenders suffered abusive and deprived childhoods. Treatment that focuses on the inner child and such qualities as forgiveness and self- esteem could benefit offenders. Some New Age teachings tempered by the ancient spiritual traditions may offer offenders the hope they can create a future that brings greater fulfillment than their past. This changed future may include growing out of the fear of victimization, becoming more positive and open to possibilities, viewing oneself with more confidence and humility, understanding the futility of violence, and attaining emotional and financial sufficiency.