Source: (2007) in, Gerry Johnstone and Daniel W. Van Ness, eds., Handbook of Restorative Justice. Cullompton, Devon: Willan Publishing. pp. 598-614

"This chapter introduces some critical perspectives found in this literature and looks briefly at their implications. The critical perspectives introduced here can be summarized as follows: 1. Proponents' descriptions of restorative justice are vague and incoherent; 2. Proponents make exaggerated claims about what restorative justice can achieve; 3. A significant move away from punishment towards restorative justice will undermine the policy of deterrence; 4. A significant move away from punishment towards restorative 'justice' will result in a failure to do justice; 5. A significant move away from punishment towards restorative justice will result in a failure to do justice; 5. A significant move away from punishment towards restorative justice will result in systematic departures from axiomatic principles of justice; 6. While presented as a radical alternative to conventional approaches to wrongdoing, restorative justice actually shares a great deal with conventional approaches and its introduction will simply extend the reach of conventional systems of penal control." (excerpt)