Source: (2013) Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law. 46:1267-1320.

This Article is the first to analyze prison location and its relationship to U.S. and international theories of criminal punishment. Strangely, scholarly literature overlooks criminal prison designation procedures-the procedures by which a court or other institution designates the prison facility in which a recently convicted individual is to serve his or her sentence. This Article identifies this gap in the literature-the prison location omission-and fills it from three different vantage points: (1) U.S. procedural provisions governing prison designation; (2) international procedural provisions governing prison designation; and (3) the relationship between imprisonment and broader theories of criminal punishment. Through comparison of U.S. and international prison designation systems, this Article argues that prison location materially advances core rationales of criminal punishment. (author's abstract)