Source: (2006) New York: Nova Science Purblishers, Inc.

"Psychologists in different tributaries of the discipline have long been preoccupied with aspects of 'Justice', but none previously has addressed the essential question raised in this book -- namely of justice being as vital to the essentials of life and to the flowering of the human spirit as other basic needs. The same can be said for academics and practitioners in other fields of social science, including mental health and psychiatry. Except for the groups represented by two contributors in this book, it seems to me that lawyers in the main direct their expertise to the superficial maintenance of systems of justice rather than to the underlying reasons for doing so. This book, arising from academic, clinical, empirical, and theoretical studies, goes further by giving justice its proper place in the hierarchy of basic human needs. It is designed in accord with a general system theory in which contributions are welcomed from scholars and researchers in different domains of knowledge. Above all, it is written in the hope of inducing others to share a commitment to maintaining justice and do their utmost to prevent injustice." (excerpt)