Source: (1996) Juvenile Justice. 3(1).

These articles examine the restorative model of juvenile justice, the community-based aftercare initiative of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), the use of satellite teleconferencing for training juvenile justice and child welfare personnel, and other issues related to juvenile justice. The paper on the restorative model describes it as a promising new approach that focuses on meaningful community involvement as an alternative to the paradigm of treatment versus punishment. Its three goals are accountability through offender responsibility and amends to victims; offender competency through increased skills in areas needed to function as productive adults; and public safety through both locked facilities and the strengthening of a community's capacity to prevent and control crime. Another paper describes the Intensive Community-Based Aftercare Programs Initiative, which aims to test the effectiveness of a carefully designed, highly intensified, and multidimensional model for reducing recidivism among chronic and serious juvenile offenders who are being reintegrated into their communities from secure confinement. Another article describes how OJJDP uses satellite telecommunications to disseminate training and information and information effectively and efficiently to diverse juvenile justice constituencies. Other articles focus on the reduction of overrepresentation of minority youth in confinement, a free conflict resolution curriculum, and additional OJJDP materials and resources. Abstracts courtesy of National Criminal Justice Reference Service, www.ncjrs.org.