Source: (2004) Paper presented at "New Frontiers in Restorative Justice: Advancing Theory and Practice", Centre for Justice and Peace Development, Massey University at Albany, New Zealand, 2-5 December.

South Africa has made great strides in the fight against corruption. However, there are still serious challenges to be faced. With South Africa's rating of 4.8 out of a score of 10 on Transparency International's Corruption Index, it is clear that the country is perceived as having fairly high levels of corruption. There is a general perception within the country too, that corruption is rife. Combating corruption requires a commonly accepted set of ethics. All sectors of society have a duty to ensure that children and adults alike know what is right and what is wrong. A national system of ethics must be clear on what constitutes corruption. The authors evaluate the current ethical framework and the institutional capacity of the South African Government to fight corruption. They challenge old frontiers and scouting new restorative justice practices which could be implemented in the fight against corruption. Abstract courtesy of the Centre for Justice and Peace Development, Massey University, http://justpeace.massey.ac.nz.