Source: (2004) Springfield, Ill. : C.C. Thomas.

In the last two decades or so, the modern notion of restorative justice has advanced and gained attention in juvenile justice and criminal justice spheres in many countries around the world. Some have seen potential for restorative justice theory and practice in other areas of life as well, including schools at all levels. According to David Karp and Thom Allena, while some colleges and universities have adopted restorative justice approaches to conflict and wrongdoing on their campuses, very little has been written about the use of restorative justice in the college setting. Overall, colleges and universities lag behind others in exploring, researching, experimenting with, and adopting restorative justice. Karp and Allena each have practical experience with restorative justice in the college setting. Karp helped Skidmore College in upstate New York adapt Vermont’s Reparative Probation Program for its Integrity Board. Allena assisted the University of Colorado put into place the first restorative program in a large university. With all of this in view, Karp and Allena assembled a group of scholars and student affairs professionals to examine the problem of student discipline and the potential of restorative justice as a proactive, educational response. This book is the result. Consisting of essays by academics and professionals, the book is organized into four sections: Part I, an introduction to restorative justice and overview of contemporary practice in student judicial affairs; Part II, restorative practices (accountability boards, conferencing, and mediation); Part III, campus disciplinary issues and restorative responses; and Part IV, a conclusion looking ahead to prospects for restorative justice on campuses.