Source: (2014) Alresford : Teachers' Pocketbooks.

Schools that have adopted the ancient principles of restorative justice in their approach to behaviour management report better relationships with young people, greater engagement in learning and a greater development of social and emotional competence among learners. No surprise, then, that interest in restorative practices is growing. It’s all about relationships. Wrongdoing is viewed through a ‘relational lens’. All those responsible for and affected by the behaviour are involved in solving the problem. Working in conference with a teacher/facilitator, participants come to understand the harm done to people and relationships. Accepting that such harm creates obligations and liabilities, they then focus on repairing the damage and putting things right. Expert practitioners Margaret and David provide a thorough grounding in restorative practice, with worked examples and easy-to-follow teacher scripts to get you started. If RJ is new to you, you’ll be a convert in no time! ‘Concise, comprehensive and accessible, this book is an essential companion for any school beginning its restorative journey and an aide-memoire for those already embarked.’ Mick Levens, Deputy Head, Forest Hill School ‘I welcome this pocketbook as a practical and clear guide for school staff on using the spectrum of restorative practices with pupils.’ Graham Robb, Education Consultant and Youth Justice Board member ‘If you’re searching for the ‘something’ in the ‘something must done’ be mantra, you should read this book. It de-mystifies the use of restorative approaches in schools, clearly and simply outlining theory and practice, as well as offering a persuasive case for change. Its straightforward, informative style and common-sense, step-by-step approach make it essential and enjoyable reading for both new and experienced practitioners.’ Siân Williams, Behaviour Inclusion Co-ordinator, London Borough of Lewisham (publisher's description)