Source: (2006) Paper from "The Next Step: Developing Restorative Communities, Part 2," the IIRP’s 8th International Conference on Conferencing, Circles and other Restorative Practices, October 18-20, 2006, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA.

In this paper I propose to discuss the importance of a reflection to conferencing. Moore and McDonald1 make a useful distinction between the process and program elements of conferencing. (Process refers to the conferencing techniques that are taught in training sessions and includes elements of the script used by convenors. The program elements include where, by whom and under what guidelines the conferencing program operates such as the legislation, the position of the program, gatekeeping procedures, aims and objectives, reporting requirements and other elements specific to this program.) Two other elements to complete the picture on program implementation are the participants, including the practitioner, who convenes the conference and the policies that govern the operation of the program. What the participants bring to the conference can have a significant impact on the process and outcomes. The policies, which reflect the overall aims of the program, clearly impact on whether the conferencing program is beneficial or harmful for participants. I want to draw upon some practice examples based upon my experience in conferencing to highlight the importance of reflection in all these areas to the success of the conferencing process. Before commencing with practice examples, I want to draw upon some practice examples based upon my experience in conferencing to highlight the importance of reflection in all these areas to the success of the conferencing process. (excerpt)


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