Source: (2006) In Naomi Roht-Arriaza and Javier Mariezcurrena, Ed., Transitional Justice in the Twenty-First Century, Beyond Truth versus Justice. Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press. Pg. 278-300.

"The regime of Chadian ex-President Hissene Habre, in eight years of repression (1982-90), was responsible for thousands of cases of political killings, torture, "disappearances" and arbitrary detention. After his ouster, the new government led by his former defense chief established a Truth Commission, but then buried its report and ignored it recommendations. Ten years later, Chadian and international activists joind forces to obtain Habre's landmark indictment in his Senegalese exile. Through several twists and turns, the case has survived and Habre now faces extradition to Belgium. The international prosecution had an immediate impact back in Chad, empowering his victims and putting transitional justice issues back on the table for the first time in many years. But Chad remains a repressive society with no tradition of accountability, and Habre's victims continue to wait for the Chadiam government to address the suffering that they or their families endured." (excerpt)